Roger Galatas Interests

Available Properties

Overview

Houston Chronicle
Roger Galatas helps link the past, present and future of The Woodlands

As The Woodlands marks its 40th year, few come close to telling story behind the community better than Roger Galatas . . .

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History of The Woodlands

Are you interested in the development history of The Woodlands?  The Woodlands Community Magazine recently ran a series of articles authored by Roger Galatas based on his popular book, “The Woodlands, The Inside Story of Creating a Better Hometown”, and other writings.  The articles provide a behind the scenes look at how George Mitchell’s successful community development initiative survived a challenging startup, including a brush with bankruptcy, to become a thriving community with international recognition where people live, work, play and learn. 

Read the stories about The Woodlands

Wizard of The Woodlands

No matter how much he accomplishes, Roger Galatas seems destined to work in the shadow of his boss, oilman George P. Mitchell. But the president of The Woodlands Corp. prefers it that way.

When asked if he has full control of The Woodlands Corp., Galatas answers, “I have all I need.” And when he is quizzed about Mitchell’s influence on how the company operates, Galatas responds, “George gives us a sense of direction about where we need to go, but it’s up to us on how we get there.

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Houston Chronicle
Mitchell provided the world an example in The Woodlands

George Mitchell's legacy long will resonate with those in the energy industry, real estate and anyone with a connection to Galveston. But the impact of his work will also be felt by families across the country who may never have heard his name.

These are families who live in master-planned communities that have been influenced by Mitchell's The Woodlands.

Mitchell, who died July 26 at age 94, welcomed those who wanted to learn what made his development unique.

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Big Builder
Texas Hold 'Em

Loblolly pines still tower above the gently rolling, wooded land you find some 30 miles north and west of Houston. After years of timbering, though, far more populous young pine trees shoot up amid hardwoods – oaks, gums and clusters of dogwoods that catch your eye in some sunlit glen, and etch their beauty into your memory of the topography. Unpaved timber trails snake through the woods and wetlands of Woodard Ranch, in southwest Montgomery County, about 12 miles north and west of Interstate 45. Even a Ford Expedition can get stuck in a bog on those timber roads. In fact, it happened to Roger Galatas a month or so ago, as he gave an executive tour of the 6,634-acre ranch to a party interested in bidding to buy it for development.

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Houston Chronicle
Editorial on George Mitchell by Jim Barlow and Roger Galatas

Business people are getting a bad rap these days. Much of it is deserved. We’ve seen the list of incompetent, failed and even crooked executives on the daily pages of this newspaper. But those headlines obscure the facts.  The great majority of people running businesses large and small are competent and honest. Some are even brilliant. One of the best examples of that brilliance can be found here in Houston in the person of George P. Mitchell.

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Tradition Bound

A new $1.7 billion, 4,600-acre master-planned community called Tradition is underway on the Gulf Coast near the towns of Biloxi and Gulfport in Harrison County, Mississippi. Tradition’s developers say they are capitalizing on an unprecedented boom along the Mississippi Gulf Coast and the area’s emergence as the third-ranked casino gaming destination in the country. Harrison County draws approximately 20 million tourists each year, and Fodor’s Travel named the Mississippi Coast among its top ten destinations for 1999.

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Houston Chronicle
Old problem: taming new sprawl

Along roadways around Houston the landscape is changing in a way that is worrisome. Closely spaced houses replace trees and open fields in many areas. More houses each day. New billboards advertise our future.

But let's also recognize that the Houston region is rich in resources — with talented, caring people, attractive centers of commerce and many neat neighborhoods. For most, this is — and will continue to be — a great place to live and work.

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